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Sweet, sweet music: Meet the man who makes playable chocolate records
09.08.2014
05:28 am

Topics:
Food
Music

Tags:
records
chocolate

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If you want to know how to make sweet, sweet music, then take a tip from Peter Lardong who created the world’s first chocolate record—the only disc that can be played and eaten. Herr Lardong from Berlin, Germany, came up with the idea of using chocolate to make discs after experimenting with ice cream, cheese, butter, beer, cola and sausages. Eventually the former brewery worker hit upon his own “special” mixture of chocolate which he melts, then pours onto a silicon mold of his favorite recordings. When the chocolate sets, the disc is removed and is ready to play or eat.
 
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Each chocolate record costs approximately $6 and can be played on a standard record player for up to twelve times before it wears out (no doubt ruining the stylus) and then has to be eaten.
 

 
H/T Voices of East Anglia
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Talking stamps: Tiny vinyl record postage stamps that were playable, 1972
08.15.2014
10:50 am

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
records
vinyl
vinyl stamps
talking stamps


 
Known as the “first talking stamps” in 1972, these tiny vinyl postage stamps from Bhutan were totally playable and when the needle was put on the record stamp you heard Bhutan’s national anthem and a capsule history of the nation. Talking stamps were thin plastic embossed records with removable back to expose the adhesive.

A pretty interesting concept, right? I’ve never seen one in the flesh, but from what I’m seeing on eBay, they’re highly collectable (an entire set is around $495.00) and even still legal for mailing use.

WFMU has a few samples of what these tiny vinyl stamps sound like. You can listen to them here.


 

 

 

 
via WFMU and Bhutan Today

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘Bone music’: Soviet-era bootleg records of banned rock and jazz pressed on X-ray plates

X-ray records
 
What do you do if you’re living in the USSR in, say, 1957, and you’d like to press an illegal record of some banned rock and roll or jazz? Consumer tape recorders don’t exist, and in the USSR, vinyl is difficult to come by. How do you proceed?

One thing you might do is press your contraband beats into discarded X-rays. A police state does wonders for the sheer inventiveness of its citizens, does it not? Clever Russians eager to hear some liberating rock and roll would salvage exposed X-rays from hospital waste bins and archives and use them to make records.

In the 1946-1961 era, some ingenious Russians began recording banned bootlegged jazz, boogie woogie and rock ‘n’ roll on exposed X-ray film. The thick radiographs would be cut into discs of 23 to 25 centimeters in diameter; sometimes the records weren’t circular. But the exact shape didn’t matter so much, as long as the thing played.

“Usually it was the Western music they wanted to copy,” says Sergei Khrushchev, the son of Nikita Khrushchev. “Before the tape recorders they used the X-ray film of bones and recorded music on the bones, bone music.” As author Anya von Bremzen elaborates: “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole. ... You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan—forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

I can’t wait until Record Store Day 2015, when limited edition X-ray releases will surely be some of the most sought-after purchases!
 
X-ray records
 
X-ray records
 
X-ray records
 
X-ray records
 
Previously on DM:
Vintage X-ray ‘vinyl’ from Russia

 
via Vinyl of the Day
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
60s and 70s Asian album covers


 
David Greenfield has amassed a collection of records from Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Hong Kong and Japan which are all available for purchase online. I liked going through his collections from the 60s and 70s. It’s a great resource for loopy graphic design inspiration!
 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Hey vinyl lovers: ‘Living Stereo’ introduced by RCA, 1958


 
RCA Victor introduces “a miracle,” their Orthophonic, high-fidelity, home stereo sound system.

Bob Banks, one-time RCA Victor marketing manager of radio sales and their Victrola division, narrates this short film introducing the RCA’s new “living stereo” records and stereophonic hi-fi gear. The year was 1958, ground zero for the birth of the “space age bachelor pad” as my pal Byron Werner so famously dubbed it.

The demonstration utilizes left and right-hand sections of orchestra married together to create the fullness of “living stereo” and gives you a stereo stylus’s POV as it travels across a record groove (“a canyon of sound!”). If you are a vinyl fan, it’s pretty fun and informative.
 

 
Via Douglas Hovey

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Famous people hanging out with their vinyl
06.10.2011
11:20 am

Topics:
History
Music

Tags:
Vinyl
records


Bill Clinton (yes, I know this is photoshopped)
 
Famous faces and their record collections.


Patti Smith
 

Sophia Loren
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Odd photoshopped vintage LP sleeves
04.22.2011
12:58 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:
records
photoshop
LPs
albums
Twisted Vintage

image
 
These cleverly Photoshopped album covers are pretty funny. I had to do a double take because I wasn’t entirely sure what was going on… I think my favorite is “I Don’t Like Me Either.”

All images are from the devious and NSFW website Twisted Vintage.
 
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image
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Gallery of defaced LP sleeves

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
GIF: Vinyl Makes Them Nervous
11.02.2010
10:10 am

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:
records
vinyl

image
 
Oh noes! I’m scared!
 
(via Das Kraftfuttermischwerk)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Have your ashes pressed into your favorite vinyl record when you die
08.27.2010
12:57 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Music
R.I.P.

Tags:
records
vinyl

image
 
I’m going to have mine pressed into Eddie Murphy’s “Party All The Time.” From Wired UK:

Music lovers can now be immortalised when they die by having their ashes baked into vinyl records to leave behind for loved ones.

A UK company called And Vinyly is offering people the chance to press their ashes in a vinyl recording of their own voice, their favourite tunes or their last will and testament. Minimalist audiophiles might want to go for the simple option of having no tunes or voiceover, and simply pressing the ashes into the vinyl to result in pops and crackles.

Company presses your ashes into vinyl when you die

(via Nerdcore)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment